Excel Dental Blog

Puppy Kisses and Your Oral Health: A Risk for Periodontal Disease

Puppy Kisses and Your Oral Health: A Risk for Periodontal Disease

Our pets are near and dear to our hearts and some even feel as though they’re family. Playing with your dog or puppy brings joy to all. You may love having your dog close, and letting your dog lick your face might not seem like a big deal. After all, we’ve all heard that a dog’s mouth is cleaner than our own, right? Unfortunately, your teeth may not be thanking you for those puppy kisses. Let’s go over how your dental safety can be compromised by those dog kisses.

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What to Do about Malocclusion — Also Known as Bad Bite

What to Do about Malocclusion — Also Known as Bad Bite

You may already know about the importance of having straight teeth for avoiding tooth decay and gum disease and for maintaining a healthy-looking smile.

But have you thought about occlusion?

What’s that, you ask?

Occlusion is a funny-sounding word that refers to your bite, or the way your upper and lower teeth fit together.

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Dental Care While Pregnant- A Healthy Choice for Mom and Baby

Dental Care While Pregnant- A Healthy Choice for Mom and Baby

Pregnancy means an endless amount of checkups, ultrasounds, and doctor’s visits, but have you thought to check in with your dentist? Common misconceptions may have told you that a trip to the dentist is unsafe during pregnancy, but years of research show that dentist visits during pregnancy are actually incredibly necessary. Keep reading to learn how pregnancy makes you more susceptible to dental ailments like swollen and bleeding gums.

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The Health Benefits of Xylitol

The Health Benefits of Xylitol

You may have heard of sugar substitutes before, but do you know how they can impact your dental health? Xylitol is one of the sugar substitutes that could be keeping your smile at its best. Keep reading to find out how xylitol can benefit your teeth.

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Treating Periodontal Disease at Home: Is a Sodium Hypochlorite Solution Right for You?

Treating Periodontal Disease at Home: Is a Sodium Hypochlorite Solution Right for You?

If you have periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, you are hardly alone.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that almost half of American adults, and nearly 65 million of those over 30, have some form of gum disease. In its earliest stage, known as gingivitis, gum disease begins as an inflammation, and can progress to include the risk of tooth loss.

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Is Bottled Water Harming Your Teeth?

Is Bottled Water Harming Your Teeth?

Bottled water is incredibly convenient and keeps you hydrated while on-the-go, but is it good for your teeth? When it comes to drinking bottled water, you may be doing more harm than good on your enamel.

Learn how the pH of your bottled water might be working to damage your teeth.

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Mouthwash and pH: Is Mouthwash Good for Your Teeth?

Mouthwash and pH: Is Mouthwash Good for Your Teeth?

Who doesn’t love that clean, refreshing feeling that mouthwash gives you?

Choosing a healthy mouthwash or mouth rinse can be a good addition to your oral care plan. It can help to loosen debris or plaque from around your teeth and gums.

However, so can swishing with plain water. Also keep in mind that mouthwash is not a substitute for your regular routine of brushing twice a day, flossing once a day and visiting your dentist twice a year.

It’s also important to make sure you’re choosing a product that doesn’t do more harm than good.

Watch out for mouthwash with alcohol, which can dry out your mouth and may increase risk of tooth decay. In addition, an alcohol free mouthwash may be less likely to increase the acidity in your mouth.

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What’s the Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Systemic Disease?

What’s the Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Systemic Disease?

What’s the Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Systemic Disease?

You may already know that periodontal disease — also called gum disease — can be a serious problem for your oral health.

Gum disease begins when hard plaque builds up on the gum line. If this plaque isn’t removed, it will lead to gingivitis, which is an early form of gum disease. Over time, untreated gum disease can increase your risk of tooth loss.

But how does gum disease affect your overall health? Are people with some medical conditions at special risk?

Let’s take a look at the relationship between periodontal disease and your systemic health. It’s just another reason why it’s so important to maintain healthy gums.

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